One act to rule them all

Ponoka Composite High School’s One Acts Night and Art Show needed only one night to make a wonderful impact.

As she goes blind in jail

Ponoka Composite High School’s One Acts Night and Art Show needed only one night to make a wonderful impact.

Ponoka High School Broncs Theatre group took to the stage last week to perform two one-act plays that won them several awards at zones earlier this year.

“We just wanted the chance to do them again and show them to the community,” said drama teacher Airyn Street.

Put on purely for entertainment, the plays fed high energy and lots of laughs to the audience. “We don’t want to teach a lesson tonight. We don’t want to rock the world. We just want to have fun,” said Street.

The two plays, with a cast of only five, explored everything from first love to every actors greatest fears.

An Actors Nightmare included all five students and what happens when an actor forgets his lines, has no idea who he is or what a play is even about. “It’s literally an actor’s nightmare . . . Craziness ensues,” said Street.

This was also the students’ favorite play to perform for the nonsensical dream-like silliness and mystery that shrouds the ending.

At the end of the play, the character George, played by Tyler Louis, appears to die, but did he die for real or was it actually just a nightmare? “That’s the mystery, nobody knows if he dies or not,” said Miranda Johnson, who plays Sarah.

The audience also loved the performance, which was not only made better by the talents of the actors, but the script itself was full of sharp wit, light shots at other plays and slapstick comedy. “They laughed at the right parts,” explained actress Sam Quinn.

Counting to Three was the more serious play of the two, but the perfect timing of Chandler McLaren and Megan Grant, as well as the exuberance they threw into their parts, made it one worth remembering.

The proceeds from ticket sales will be split between the high school’s drama department and Klaglahachie Fine Arts Society. “We do our musicals here (Ponoka United Church) every year. They have a great volunteer base and a great space to work in. We love working with them,” said Street.

Before the plays started, and during intermission, the audience had the chance to admire a small portion of art created by the Ponoka Art Club; an exhibit was set up in the church to co-inside with the performances.

“Because we’re fine arts we like to promote everybody,” said Richard McKelvie of the Klaglahachie Fine Arts Society.