A day of Remembrance at Outreach

When people think of war they envision a picture of a bloody battle, an image they’ve seen in a text book or magazine. If they could only look deeper than what’s laid out in front of them.

When people think of war they envision a picture of a bloody battle, an image they’ve seen in a text book or magazine. If they could only look deeper than what’s laid out in front of them. I think that is the one thing that makes the one day that we were always supposed to remember so easy to forget.

On Nov. 6, 2008 the Ponoka Outreach School along with the Ponoka Alternative Supports School (PASS), was welcomed to host their Remembrance Day service at the Ponoka Legion to commemorate those who laid down their lives so that we all may live.

Every year Canadians pause in a silent moment of remembrance for the men and women who have served and continue to serve our country during times of war, conflict and peace.

“We remember so that we never forget those individuals who fought for us – some gave up careers, some their families, and some their lives,” said Mr. Lawrence Hrycan, Ponoka Outreach principal. “We live as we do today in Canada because of the very unselfish giving of others.  We must always remember.”

Students and staff who attended the ceremony listened carefully to everyone who had made a point of participating in the event; by reading a passage, writing a poem or just lending a helping hand.

Going back as far as I can remember from past Remembrance Day services; there has always been one poem that has stuck out in my mind. The poem is called “Please wear a Poppy”, it almost brings a tear to my eyes every year that I hear it. Just goes to show you the power that words can carry.

“I have been really pleased with the student participation in our ceremony – the PowerPoint presentations, art work, poems, reading other pieces”, stated Mr. Scott Lewis, Ponoka Outreach Vice Principal, “and the behavior of our students is always exemplary.”

As the ceremony ended everyone made sure to pay their respects to the fallen soldiers by stopping and pausing for a moment in front of the cenotaph, marking the ‘wrap up’ of the event.