Council accepts list of historical sites

Fifteen significant sites in Ponoka have been designated by town council as municipal historic resources.

The F.E. Algar Building

Fifteen significant sites in Ponoka have been designated by town council as municipal historic resources.

A 16th, the wooden CPR dam on the Battle River, is seen has historically significant but because it is in the river, it is technically not within the municipality but it will be recognized in future planning.

“The preparation of this inventory is a major step in heritage management planning for the town,” consultant Judy Larmour told town council recently. “The inventory also forms the basis for a municipal designation program, which is essentially the next step to protect buildings through bylaw.”

Any future decisions involving a building’s designation by council as a Municipal Historic Resource will require the consent and involvement of the building owner. Owners of designated Municipal Historic Resources listed on the Alberta Register of Historic Places are eligible for ongoing grants for approved conservation work that protect the character-defining features of the property.

Alterations to the “visible character-defining elements” of a building designated a Municipal Historic Resource would need prior approval from council, Larmour said. “It’s not just a matter of alterations; it’s also a matter or repairs.”

A significant historic building would communicate its significance by retaining sufficient integrity in its historic appearance and building materials. It may be significant for one or a combination of different reasons: for its design, such as the Sweet Block; or for its building materials, like the former Ponoka Community Rest Room; or its function like the Ponoka Jubilee Library.

Larmour said most owners of buildings on Ponoka’s heritage inventory “support the objectives of preserving the heritage of the town.” There is a willingness among these owners “to kind of get the ball rolling.”

“It is important to consider how the inventory can be integrated as a management tool in the town planning process, policies, databases and planning documents,” Larmour said. “So any proposed intervention that would affect the building or site would be automatically flagged in the system.

“When anything comes up about the building, everybody is aware from the get-go that it is a building that has been identified as a heritage site whether or not it has actually been designated.”

Under terms of the Alberta Historical Resources Act, owners of buildings designated a Municipal Historic Resource “are entitled to seek compensation from the municipality in relation to the economic value of the building should (it) be designated,” Larmour explained.

Compensation could be non-financial, it could be tax abatement, a relaxation of the parking requirement or the like.

Larmour suggested the Municipal Heritage Inventory and the statements of interest for each building be made available to the public at Town Hall and at Fort Ostell Museum.

Council should also support initiatives by the Fort Ostell Museum to build on the research and information from the inventory project to foster awareness of heritage buildings and continue the oral history project initiated under this project, she added.

A future phase 2 of the municipal inventory project could assess residential and non-commercial historic properties in Ponoka.

Just Posted

Alberta judge cleared in case where sex assault victim was shackled, jailed

Judicial council: Judge Raymond Bodnarek acted on Crown’s advice, tried to minimize victim’s hardship

Breton/Thorsby RCMP investigate theft of boat

RCMP say stolen jet boat and trailer valued at approximately $80,000

Judicial council finds no misconduct by Alberta judge of Aboriginal sex assault victim

Hearing after complaints of alleged poor treatment of woman with pseudonym Angela Cardinal

Wetaskiwin liquor store robbed Feb. 21

Two suspects arrested after store employee threatened with bear spray

Town of Ponoka to hand over fire services to county

Council voted unanimously to have the county take over May 1. County meets Thursday morning

WATCH: Ponoka Warriors volleyball host largest ever Family Day tournament

Five divisions, 32 teams participate in 12th annual Family Day tournament

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

OLYMPICS 101: Oldest and youngest Canadians to reach the podium

This year, Canada sent its most athletes in Winter Games history, here’s a look at record breakers

Federal budget to unveil incentive for 5-week second parent leave: official

Goal behind the measure is to give parents more incentive to share child-rearing responsibilities

Notley says Alberta watching B.C. court bid closely, will get no free ride on it

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley ended the three-week ban on B.C. wine, calming the trade war

Trudeau ends troubled India trip in his comfort zone of hockey and youth

The players, 18-25, came to New Delhi from Ladakhi in northern India, as part of outreach program

Team Canada’s Dave Duncan apologizes after drunken joyride in Pyeongchang

Duncan, his wife Maja and Canadian technical coach William Raine detained by South Korean police

Sask. school shooter to be sentenced as adult

The man was just shy of his 18th birthday when he killed four people and injured seven others

Internet questions PM’s fashion choices in India

The Trudeaus’ eight-day visit has been dogged by various controversies since it began Feb. 17

Most Read