Good ole memories make a comeback

Many old farm boys and girls, as well as those whose passions now lay in the rural municipalities they now serve

Donna Tona grew up as a farm girl on a cow-calf operation near Rimbey.

Donna Tona grew up as a farm girl on a cow-calf operation near Rimbey.

Many old farm boys and girls, as well as those whose passions now lay in the rural municipalities they now serve, were treated to a familiar piece of the past at this spring Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties Conference.

Donna Tona, who grew up in Rimbey on a cow-calf farming operation, gave a lively presentation of what growing up on the farm was universally like in Alberta.

She spoke of and good-naturedly poked fun at the stereotypical personalities that almost every rural communities has, which can be picked out of the crowd in an instant.

First there are the ratepayers who complain about the roads, no matter what. They aren’t graded properly, there’s potholes, divots at the stop signs or the gravel isn’t right.

Next came the “pesky acreage owner” who wants all farming to stop at 5 p.m. sharp because the dust is affecting their relaxing rural lifestyle.

For those not fond of hog operations, Tona suggested perfuming the lagoon to see of that helps.

“What happens in rural communities: urbans don’t understand rural communities,” said Tona.

The farm raised kid — not the goat variety — despite a sometimes questionable childhood grew up hardy innovate and with good business sense.

However, questionable depends on what side of the pasture you’re standing on.

To a farm toddler, when your first solid food comes from the dog’s bowl, well that’s nothing to get hysterical over. And joining in with the cats, being able to catch milk streaming from the cow with your mouth is considered a success.

Without urbanized toys, farm kids had to find their own entertainment. This included freshly killed chicken races.

Despite strong family roots, the farm father and farm daughter didn’t always see eye to eye, especially when it came to dating.

When shining a shotgun took the place of a handshake and “Where are you taking my daughter, son?” really means “You think you have the right to see my daughter, son?” every father knew his daughter would be home by midnight.

As Tona told her stories and reminded the conference delegates of the good ‘ole days laughter and a few nostalgic sighs could be heard throughout the hall.