Mediocre band missing notable presence

Listeners would be hard pressed to pick out anything wrong in Canadian band Christ vs Krishna’s newest EP, Move and Scale

Christ vs Krishna’s newest EP

Christ vs Krishna’s newest EP

Listeners would be hard pressed to pick out anything wrong in Canadian band Christ vs Krishna’s newest EP, Move and Scale, however the band has a standard alternative rock sound, lacking in the “It Factor” that will make them stand out from similar bands.

The band has garnered a lot of play on college radio, which sounds like a good fit.

Christ vs Krishna is a band with an intimate quality that wouldn’t be out of place in a dark, smoky pub where college students too cool for obnoxious clubs could appreciate them over a beer.

Saying that, the intimacy that comes with their quiet, understated sound needs to add punch. Those listening to the album while multitasking could slip through the entire track list without realizing the song had changed.

Lead vocalist Pank has the raw yet captivating voice similar to older style UK bands, such as One Night Only — minus the accents.

His voice harmonizes perfectly with the instruments accompanying each song; from the easy bass, to the tambourine, to electronica keyboard.

The album’s last track, The Sorrows, opens with a subtle jazz bar feel but it quickly moves back into the band’s established formula of bass and drums layered with a keyboard.

While the band has perfected their hooks and rhythm, Move and Scale’s opening track, closing track, and every track in between are too similar and too understated to make differentiating the songs easy.

Listen to one of the songs and you’ve heard the whole album, even the lyrics aren’t catchy or memorable.

Unless standard alternative rock is your vice Christ vs Krishna’s EP may be something to skip over.