More than paint recycled during toxic round up

Old paint, batteries, pesticides, solvents, and even used paper was given a chance to be recycled or disposed of properly

Working behind a wall of paint. Josh McBride with Clean Harbors loads paint cans for recycling at the Toxic Round Up Sept. 14 at the fire hall.

Old paint, batteries, pesticides, solvents, and even used paper was given a chance to be recycled or disposed of properly at the Toxic Round Up Sept. 15 at the fire hall.

According to Fire Chief Ted Dillon the Ponoka Fire Department has been organizing these annual toxic round ups for approximately 20 years.

It first started with the Rotary Club, who made use of a government grant, and Dillon helped set up the location.

“We thought the fire hall is a good place to do it,” said Dillon. “As time went on we ended up taking it over because it is a need for the community.”

The amount of product coming in has not dissipated much over the years and it keeps the volunteer fire department and residents busy when it is held.

Many county and town residents are able to dispose of their household toxic waste as well as paper, which is in its third year with the round up.

Paper Cuts owner Peter Kocher does not charge for his on-site paper shredding service during the round up. “We just do it as a community service.”

He feels the benefit of shredding on his truck is more of a security for clients.

“Once it gets to here, you’re done…it’s more secure,” stated Kocher.

His paper is sent to either Ontario or the United States to a pulp mill for recycling where they make either paper or toilet paper depending on the quality of recycled materials.

The company handling the other waste is Clean Harbors from Red Deer that bought out Envirosort several years ago. Clean pack specialist Tim Powell said the company still runs Envirosort’s banner because of the amount of community round ups the company assists with.

Paint is sent to a company in Edmonton where it is blended with peat moss and sawdust. Once the flammable contents of the paints evaporate it is then sent to a landfill designated for this kind of material. All chemicals are sent to the Red Deer plant where they are categorized and separated and eventually sent to Swan Hills to be incinerated.

According to Powell, recycling chemicals can be a challenge. He feels some chemicals such as soap can be used before having to dispose of.

“Give it to somebody who needs it,” he suggests.

The company keeps busy with approximately 70 community round ups per year. “We’re busy almost every weekend until October and we start up again in March.”

Among some of the other waste brought in are mercury, old fire extinguishers and aerosol cans.

There were 15 barrels of paint this year, one up from 2011 and although not all the numbers were in, volunteers were kept busy throughout the day.

Just Posted

Ponoka RCMP respond to intoxicated male in Golden Leisure Lodge

On May 15, 2019 the Ponoka RCMP responded to a complaint of… Continue reading

Town to sign five-year policing agreement with Ponoka Stampede

The Town of Ponoka will go ahead with a five-year renewable agreement… Continue reading

UPDATED: Ponoka RCMP arrest male on Canada wide warrant

UPDATE for Immediate Release: Collin James Courteoreille was wanted on a Canada… Continue reading

Town passes 2019 budgets and tax bylaw with 2.2 per cent increase

Ponoka town council passed a $25.5 million 2019 capital and operating budget… Continue reading

Alberta throne speech followed by bill to repeal provincial carbon tax

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has already signalled that if Alberta removes the tax, it will impose its federal carbon levy

Pipeline protester chimes in on Justin Trudeau’s B.C. fundraising speech

The government purchased the Trans Mountain pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion

Canada stripping citizenship from Chinese man over alleged marriage fraud

The move comes amid severely strained relations between Ottawa and Beijing

Mayor says northern Alberta town still under threat from nearby wildfire

The blaze has now eaten its way through about 920 square kilometres of forest

Bashaw RCMP assist Stettler in arrest

Man out on bail sitting in custody after vehicle theft spree

Ottawa spending $24.5M to research health benefits, risks of pot use

$390,000 will fund two cannabis public awareness

Crackdown on money laundering does not include federal public inquiry: minister

An independent report commissioned concluded $7.4 billion was laundered in B.C. last year

Trudeau’s action plan on climate change brings B.C. politician out of retirement

Terry Lake, a former B.C. health minister, is running for federal office in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Survey finds minimal progress in Canadian military’s fight against sexual misconduct

1.6 per cent of regular-force members — 900 military personnel — reported having been victims of sexual assaults over past year

Most Read