PCHS students take on 30-Hour Famine

It’s one thing to be hungry after missing a meal but going hungry takes on a new meaning if it’s done on purpose.

It’s one thing to be hungry after missing a meal but going hungry takes on a new meaning if it’s done on purpose.

More than 60 students at Ponoka Composite High School (PCHS) fasted April 12 and 13 to raise funds and awareness for World Vision’s 30-Hour Famine program. A record $7,200 — more than double from last year — was raised for the program, said teacher and organizer Brady Teeling. “A lot of them (students) wanted to do something to help.”

Part of students’ learning includes global citizenship and considering how other areas of the world differ from their own.

“They see how the rest of the world is less fortunate,” he explained.

Learning about other countries is easier for students because of advancements in technology. A person can easily research another part of the world with a few keyword searches and with this knowledge students are seeing how well off they are, he added.

Kids were allowed to drink as much water and juice as they wanted but the forced fast gave them a chance to fulfill their goals.

“They feel really successful about something that they did,” said Teeling.”You can’t explain it, you just have to do it.”

Students in grades 9 to 12 camped out at the high school and brought their video games and hung out most of the night in different areas with no real agenda. The only program of the evening was a 20-minute group session and video from World Vision on the purpose behind the 30-Hour-Famine.

This is the fifth year of the program and Teeling is proud of students’ dedication to the task. “The kids always impress me of course.”

The fast is concluded with sandwiches and cookies to celebrate the end of project and Teeling finds students have a strong sense of accomplishment from the work.

Funds from the 30-Hour-Famine go to African famine relief projects.