Fit to be tied: Peggy Williamson made this for herself out of her husband’s old ties from the 1950s. The quilt itself was made in the 1980s on a machine with some minor hand stitching. It was among the many that were on display at the Ponoka Fort Ostell Museum as part of its Heritage long weekend tea and quilt show Aug. 3. The quilts will be on display until September.                                Submitted photo

Fit to be tied: Peggy Williamson made this for herself out of her husband’s old ties from the 1950s. The quilt itself was made in the 1980s on a machine with some minor hand stitching. It was among the many that were on display at the Ponoka Fort Ostell Museum as part of its Heritage long weekend tea and quilt show Aug. 3. The quilts will be on display until September. Submitted photo

PHOTOS: Heritage quilts

Display of quilts at the Ponoka Fort Ostell Museum

Cosy time for tea: Ponoka’s Fort Ostell Museum held its Heritage long weekend tea and quilt show on Aug. 3 featuring numerous quilts including a special one (left) made by the Grand Meadow Farm Women’s Union of Alberta in 1955 in honour of Alberta’s golden anniversary. Designed by Alma Hagemann, the blocks were made by families or neighbours, paying 10 cents for each name with it being raffled off at 25 cents per ticket to raise funds for Red Cross parcels.

Submitted photo

Fit to be tied: Peggy Williamson made this for herself out of her husband’s old ties from the 1950s. The quilt itself was made in the 1980s on a machine with some minor hand stitching. It was among the many that were on display at the Ponoka Fort Ostell Museum as part of its Heritage long weekend tea and quilt show Aug. 3. The quilts will be on display until September.

Submitted photo

Unique quilts: Three quilts that represent life of the early settlers — the Star quilt (left) made back in 1878 by Mattie Gole Galloway, a common pattern symbolizing faith and guidance for those heading west, to the Charm quilt (right) started by Anna Eakin around 1890 and finished about 50 years later by Myrtle Dewhirst, with 2000 pieces of unique fabric designs sewn together. (middle) The Windmill pattern was also popular for pioneers and homesteaders as an easy to make and simple, yet appealing design.

Submitted photo

Display of quilts at the Ponoka Fort Ostell Museum

 

Unique quilts: Three quilts that represent life of the early settlers — the Star quilt (left) made back in 1878 by Mattie Gole Galloway, a common pattern symbolizing faith and guidance for those heading west, to the Charm quilt (right) started by Anna Eakin around 1890 and finished about 50 years later by Myrtle Dewhirst, with 2000 pieces of unique fabric designs sewn together. (middle) The Windmill pattern was also popular for pioneers and homesteaders as an easy to make and simple, yet appealing design.                                Submitted photo

Unique quilts: Three quilts that represent life of the early settlers — the Star quilt (left) made back in 1878 by Mattie Gole Galloway, a common pattern symbolizing faith and guidance for those heading west, to the Charm quilt (right) started by Anna Eakin around 1890 and finished about 50 years later by Myrtle Dewhirst, with 2000 pieces of unique fabric designs sewn together. (middle) The Windmill pattern was also popular for pioneers and homesteaders as an easy to make and simple, yet appealing design. Submitted photo