Vintage Bike Rally draws diverse selection

Ponoka’s 16th annual Vintage Bike Rally, or as regulars called it “the annual Ponoka bike wash” because it usually rains

Ted Bond and his custom-built Thunderbike visited the Ponoka Vintage Bike Rally.

Ted Bond and his custom-built Thunderbike visited the Ponoka Vintage Bike Rally.

Ponoka’s 16th annual Vintage Bike Rally, or as regulars called it “the annual Ponoka bike wash” because it usually rains when it’s held, brought in fans of all ages, and species.

More than 50 bikes, ranging from 1929 to 2011 entered this year’s Show and Shine.

Jay Mauer was the proud owner of the oldest bike at the rally, the 1929 Harley that he’d custom built himself over a two-year period.

“I don’t think I’d invest that much time into another project,” Mauer said.

The bike contained a hand-stitched seat, the headlight of a car and a bottle device that takes the sand and other impurities out of the bike’s fuels to improve its performance.

Mauer built the bike to show but now he’s selling it because he needs the money for future projects.

Other bikes at the rally included a monkey-bike from the Shriners Circus.

“They used to train the monkey to ride them,” Mauer said.

The rally also hosted another exotic sight; the side cart of a Philippines taxi bike that could be married to other bikes.

The bikes came from all over the world: the Philippines, Japan, Britain, Italy, and so did the riders, who used their bikes to travel, for pure enjoyment.

“It’s freedom,” said owner Franklin Post, referring to why he loves bikes.

“They weren’t vintage when I got them” Post said with a laugh.

Bikes from many different eras attended the 1970s themed rally, and all were welcome.

The rally showed the evolution of the bodies and styles of bikes from the 1930’s up to present day.

Adventure touring is getting popular said Post. The styles of bikes coming out reflect that; lightweight bikes with big gas tanks and saddlebags.