Motorists need to slow down in our school zones

Some motorists should either turn their licenses in or realize that life is not all about you and your agenda.

Dear Editor:

I am appalled at the number of people who speed past the east side of Ponoka Elementary School during school hours and the number of people who simply do not notice children and adults waiting to cross the road at actual crosswalks.

Some motorists should either turn their licenses in or realize that life is not all about you and your agenda. Other people in this town have little ones they are trying to get to school safely.

When I send my son to school and cannot walk with him I wait sometimes very anxiously for the call saying that some motorist who was not paying attention has hit him and he has been sent to the hospital. I have taught my son the rules about waiting to cross till it’s safe and to watch out for himself, but what about you people out there who are not watching out for him? What would you feel like if you were busy taking a sip of your Tim Hortons coffee thinking about how late you are for work and you suddenly feel the sickening thud of a body slamming up against your front bumper? Knowing that child may not make it home tonight let alone to school in the first place.

I apologize if this letter is too graphic for you but something needs to be done. Occasionally the RCMP does patrol the area but unfortunately they cannot be everywhere at once. In fact, they should not have to be in a school zone patrolling for speeders and people not paying attention. Come on people, wake up. So you have to stop for 30 seconds to let a child cross the road safely; is that really going to make a difference in how late you arrive for work or if your child is going to be late for school? A little common sense and common courtesy can go a long way to make our streets safer. Please be aware and pay attention.

I hope some of you read this and recognize that you can make a difference by just taking the extra time to open your eyes, watch the speed, and have a little courtesy for your neighbours. After all, we may not live next door to each other but this is our community and we can work together to make it a safer place.

Erin Williamson