Heat warning in place for Central Alberta region

Highs are expected to reach 31C Monday afternoon

Heading into the week is proving to be a sizzling prospect for Central Albertans and much of the province as a whole.

A heat warning is in place for Red Deer, so break out the sunscreen and take precautions before heading out to enjoy the summer days, officials say.

According to the Weather Network, a warning is released when, “A period with maximum daily temperatures reaching near 29C or above and minimum overnight temperatures reaching near 14C or above is expected.”

Highs are expected to reach 31C Monday afternoon, which will actually feel like 33C

It’s forecast to cool down Tuesday, and then heat up again on Aug. 1st with highs of 27C

Mix those soaring temperatures with a cold front slowly moving southward and it’s the perfect recipe for widespread thunderstorms through Tuesday, officials point out as well.

In the heat, officials are urging residents and visitors to the area to consider rescheduling outdoor activities to the cooler hours of the day, to take frequent breaks from the heat, to spend time indoors at cooled buildings (including malls or indoor pools) and to drink lots of water and other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages to stay hydrated.

It’s also extremely important to watch for symptoms of heat stroke or heat exhaustion, such as high body temperature, lack of sweat, confusion, fainting, and unconsciousness.

“Particular vigilance is urged for vulnerable individuals, including children, seniors, individuals with pre-existing lung, heart, kidney, nervous system, mental health or diabetic conditions, outdoor workers, as well as those who are socially isolated.”

John-Paul Cragg, a meteorologist with Environment Canada, said that by Tuesday, July 31st, there will be a drop in temperatures. And beyond that, the next surge of considerable heat isn’t really expected to happen until around Aug. 6th.

“Not later this week, but the following week the forecast is showing a pretty high probability of Alberta being warmer than average.

“We put out warnings because it’s 48 hours of warmer temperatures,” he said. “That’s our warning criteria.

“It’s warmer than average, but it’s not the kind of warmth you haven’t experienced many times in Alberta.”

Cragg said that the highest recorded July temperature occurred on July 18th, 1941 when the highs hit 36.1C.

“The hottest it’s been so far this month is 30.2 degrees, so it’s still a ways off from a record.”

July is typically the hottest month of the year, with temperatures already starting to slide ever so gradually in August.

For more heat health advice, including for vulnerable individuals, visit https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/news/heat.aspx.

Just Posted

Ponoka man faces 95 theft-related charges

Police recover stolen license plates, mail, tools

Ponoka man facing almost 100 charges in relation to tip from public

Christian Singer, 32, facing dozens and dozens of charges

Ponoka paralympian focused on a new challenge

Tammy Cunnington set to compete at Para-Pan Pacific event in Australia

Furniture tender awarded at special meeting

Ponoka town council approves $140,000 in furniture spending for new town hall space

Pride in the Park takes over Bower Ponds

Central Alberta Pride week continues in Red Deer

Red Deer RCMP seek public assistance to locate Bruce Redhead

There is concern that he may have lost his way

Gun used in Fredericton killings is legal, man had licence

Police Chief Leanne Fitch said the long gun is commonly available for purchase, and is not a prohibited or restricted weapon

Ontario will sell pot online when legalization comes in the fall

There are further plans to have pot in private retail stores in early 2019

Will Idris Elba be the first black James Bond?

The British actor is fueling speculation on Twitter

Cooler weather helps crews fight Southern California wildfire

The Holy Fire has destroyed 16 structures in the Cleveland National Forest

One trillion litres of sewage leaked into lakes and rivers over last five years

Toronto, like the vast majority of Canadian cities, doesn’t monitor real-time data of sewage leaks into lakes, rivers or oceans.

Friendly tone belied desperate acts of Seattle plane thief

Investigators working to find out how an airline employee stole the plane Friday and crashed it after being chased by military jets.

Charlottesville anniversary: Peaceful protests, few arrests

The events held in both Charlottesville and Washington, largely peaceful though tense at times, were part of a day of speeches, vigils and marches marking one year.

Most Read