Joshua Boyle arrives to court in Ottawa on Monday, March 25, 2019. The assault trial of former Afghanistan hostage Boyle will be delayed for weeks or even months while the courts settle a dispute over allowable evidence.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Move could shorten delay of assault trial for ex-Afghanistan hostage Boyle

Boyle has pleaded not-guilty in Ontario court to offences against his estranged wife

Joshua Boyle’s lawyer sees a glimmer of hope that a dispute over evidence in his assault trial will be resolved quickly, leading to resumption of the former Afghanistan captive’s case as early as July.

Lawrence Greenspon is welcoming a commitment from Boyle’s estranged spouse, Caitlan Coleman, that could lead to relatively speedy resolution of the legal snag that threatens to delay the trial for years.

Boyle has pleaded not-guilty in Ontario court to offences against Coleman, including assault, sexual assault and unlawful confinement.

The alleged offences date from late 2017, after the couple returned to Canada following five years as hostages of extremists who seized them during an ill-fated trip to Asia.

The assault trial, which began in late March, is suspended indefinitely while Coleman heads to a higher court to challenge a ruling that allows Boyle to introduce evidence about certain consensual sexual activity between them.

Ian Carter, Coleman’s lawyer, says she has instructed him not to appeal the outcome of the challenge — even if it goes against her — to help ensure the trial proceeds expeditiously.

READ MORE: Wife of Joshua Boyle says she was abused, forced into sex by husband

READ MORE: Former hostage Joshua Boyle granted bail with conditions

The Canadian Press


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