Ponoka county reeve will let his name stand in October election

Ponoka County Reeve Paul McLauchlin Photo submitted

Ponoka County Reeve Paul McLauchlin’s 10 years in municipal politics has in no way dimmed his enthusiasm for the job and he is more than ready to let his name stand for another term.

“I quite enjoy it,” he said. “I have a very good council and things are going well. It’s like I have hit a sweet spot in my political career and I just want to keep that going.”

McLauchlin, who has served one term as reeve, first became a county councillor in 2007.

With the fall election coming up, he looks forward to moving ahead.

He believes that, now more than ever, rural Albertans need a strong advocate to speak up for them.

“Statistics show there are more urban than rural people in the world today,” he said.

McLauchlin is aware of the tough financial issues facing rural municipalities, but he is more than willing to face that challenge.

“We are facing a new reality with oil and gas prices so low, but it simply means we have to find new ways of doing things.”

McLauchlin plans to be proactive regarding the effects of the carbon tax on rural Alberta. If elected he plans to throw his name into the hat and run as a District 2 representative on the Climate Advisory Committee for the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties.

Last year was not without financial challenges for Ponoka County including the loss of around $3.5 million in taxes.

Despite this huge economic setback, the county was still able to hold the line on taxes. McLauchlin gives credit to previous councils for maintaining a streamlined operation over the years, a factor which definitely helped the present day council deal with this unforeseen crisis.

Being prudent and not relying on provincial grants to keep the operations budget healthy is a practice that worked in the past and continues to be practiced by the present day council as well,” he said.

Even as the economic climate ebbs and flows depending on world politics, McLauchlin notes that Ponoka County is a great place to live.

“We have low taxes and great service and we are truly an agricultural county. We are one of the last few (counties) who are not getting urban pressure.”

He encourages voters to get out to the polls and cast a ballot in October.

“We need to get more people out to vote. Four years is a long time for the wrong person to be elected.”

Just Posted

PHOTOS: LeAnn Rimes kicks off Stampede

The 2019 Ponoka Stampede concert series featured a big name country star to lead things off

Local cowboys take the Stampede lead on opening night

Bareback, team roping has Ponoka sitting pretty in race to the finals

Chicks for Charity’s “Champagne High Tea” an elegant success

Chicks for Charity’s ninth annual fundraising event on June 22, “Champagne High… Continue reading

Maskwacis youth found dead on reserve

The remains of 16 year old Houston Omeasoo found June 25

VIDEO: Stop-motion artist recreates Kawhi Leonard’s famous buzzer-beater

It took Jared Jacobs about 40 hours to make the video, on top of the research

Storm caused transformer fire, power outages

Thunderstorm kept fire department busy

Lower youth minimum wage won’t apply at this year’s Calgary Stampede

A new minimum wage of $13/hr is now in effect for Alberta workers aged 13 to 17

NOTICE: Road closures today due to construction

Temporary road closure on 46 Ave. June 26, 2019 There will be… Continue reading

Rock slide in B.C. river may hinder salmon passage

DFO says it is aware that the slide occurred in a narrow portion of the Fraser River

Four-hour tarmac delay violates charter rights of Canadians with a disability: lawsuit

Bob Brown says new rules reduce the distance he can travel by air without putting his health at risk

Don’t miss Canada Day celebrations around Ponoka

There’s no shortage of exciting activities around town on Canada Day, whether… Continue reading

Fighter Jets light up Bucs’ to take AFL first place

38-3 loss puts Central Alberta into second place in the AFL

Most Read