Carbon tax: Is it worth the trouble?

This week's editorial questions whether there are benefits with a carbon tax.

Last week, UN’s World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has announced that the world is living through its hottest year on record. It said June 2016 was the 14th straight month of highest temperatures ever recorded with the melting of the Arctic ice speeding up in unprecedented fashion.

This only confirms what is a concluded debate among scientists: Man made global warming is threatening the future of the planet and time is running out to stop the world from coming to a point of no return whereby climate disasters will bring about massive loss of life, incalculable economic damage and eventually the potential for major wars, regional or global, for the control of natural resources.

While big oil and politicians allied with them continue to dispute what science has conclusively decided, men of wisdom, even from the finance sector, which is naturally a good bed fellow with big oil, are admitting that climate change is a factor that seriously needs to be taken into account in looking at the future of global economy.

One example is Mark Carney. Former governor of Bank of Canada, whom the British government didn’t hesitate at all to recruit as the governor of Bank of England and give the control of the Sterling as well as its citizenship, has been speaking about the potential financial and economic risks from the uncontrollable process of climate change since last year and he did so again even a few days ago during a visit to Toronto.

But apparently some messages are failing to reach the addresses they should.

Just below this column, there is an opinion piece authored by the Alberta director of Canadian Taxpayers’ Federation, an article that apparently takes pride in bashing the Rachel Notley government for the carbon tax her government will start to collect next year.

Lately, another group called “Friends of Science Society” has begun to campaign against not only the carbon tax but also plans to phase out coal-based energy production by claiming that any greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions from the two programs would be only “insignificant and undetectable.” And this group also alleges that warming of earth’s climate is caused by the sun, but not the CO2 emissions from our industrial plants, cars and planes.

Alberta’s conservative politicians keep singing the same tune when it comes to the issue of carbon tax, but what about the federal government’s commitments made at international fora, including last December’s UN Summit on Climate in Paris?

Under the promises made there, Canada will soon have to tax carbon emissions in every province and territory. There is talk of federal government imposing a mandatory price for carbon emissions if an agreement on the matter cannot be reached through negotiations among the provinces, territories and the feds.

Thankfully, awareness on the dangers of the global warming and climate change is reaching new heights throughout the world, but the question is whether it is fast enough and if we are able to catch the increasingly fast runaway train of record breaking temperatures.

And in this environment of ongoing political debates, perhaps carbon tax does need to be criticized, but not from the same angle as adopted by the business world and conservative political camp.

Carbon tax is way too slow and ineffective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions threatening the future of the earth. It is a kind of solution developed for politicians to be able to keep saying that they are addressing the problem within the framework of free market, and that the principles of the free market will bring about the “balance” by making the use of emission producing practices more expensive and deter the use of it.

But that kind of free market has been dead for a long time already. The new market works in different ways, with lots of distortion and it creates most of our current problems. It doesn’t take rocket science to see that solutions based on old thinking will not be enough to bring new problems to an end.

 

Just Posted

BREAKING: Wetaskiwin hotel up in flames

Fire crews have been dealing with a fire at the historic Rose Country Inn

Reflections: The early construction of then Ponoka mental hospital

Looking at the early development of then provincial mental hospital in Ponoka

Wolf Creek Schools superintendent receives contract extension

Jayson Lovell will continue to serve as superintendent through 2024

Ponoka fire crews deal with trailer fire on the QEII

There wasn’t much left of a 53 foot trailer after it went up in flames near Ponoka

Suspects from Ponoka charged in pawn shop theft

Ponoka RCMP say the two face several charges from Stampede Pawn incident

Defiant vigil starts healing in New Zealand after massacre

Police say the gunman in the shooting that killed 50 acted alone

Alberta government announces further easing of oil production restrictions

The government said it will continue to monitor the market and its response to the increases

Trudeau condemns hateful, ‘toxic segments’ of society after New Zealand shooting

Prime Minister expressed sorrow at the many attacks in recent years

Air Canada grounds its Boeing Max 8s until at least July 1 to provide certainty

Airlines around the world have been working to redeploy their fleets since their Max 8s were grounded last week

Budget to tout Liberal economic record, provide distraction from SNC furor

This is the Liberal government’s fourth and final budget before the election

Budget 2019: Five things to watch for in the Liberals’ final fiscal blueprint

Finance Minister Bill Morneau will release the Trudeau government’s final budget on Tuesday

New concussion guidelines launched for Canada’s Olympians, Paralympians

The guidelines will be in effect at this summer’s Pan American, Parapan American Games in Lima, Peru

Alphonso Davies doubtful for Canada game against French Guiana in Vancouver

Canada will be without injured captain Scott Arfield and veteran Will Johnson

Notley’s government puts priority on health care in throne speech

Lt.-Gov. Lois Mitchell kicked off the legislature session

Most Read