Just An Observation: Crisis isn’t just about being away from work

There are many challenges now, but some benefits as well

Things have gotten tough out there over the past two months since all of the restrictions were instituted due to the pandemic.

There are a lot of people dealing with withdrawal on a number of fronts.

One major item on that list is sports.

A poll released last week demonstrated that fact, showing 59 per cent of respondents are missing their NHL hockey the most during this crisis, while only 31 per cent rated Major League Baseball as their top missed sport with the NBA being missed the most by 28 per cent ( respondents could have more than one answer).

Football, both the CFL and NFL, was tracked differently with the poll asking how many would be disappointed if those seasons were cancelled. An average of 33 per cent of people across the country would miss the sport on the American side of the border.

However, when it came to our own football game, the numbers varied widely depending on where people lived.

The Maritimes saw the lowest figure at just 17 per cent, while three provinces were closer to the average — Ontario (28), Quebec (31), B.C. (33).

The highest level of disappointment, which should come as no surprise, was in on the prairies. Nearly half of Albertans (43 per cent) would be upset if the league cancelled its season, while that figure rose to over 60 per cent in Saskatchewan. Manitoba, home to the current Grey Cup champs, was at the top of the scale at 63 per cent.

While the poll only asked about professional live sports, it’s safe to say that many Canadians would love to see all sporting events make there way back to their playing surfaces.

Minor baseball, softball, lacrosse and soccer seasons in many central Alberta areas were recently cancelled to the regret of organizers, coaches and players. Spring school sports were shut down in March just as the playoffs were set to run, while other sports that run into summer are playing a waiting game in hopes that there might still be some sort of season for them.

To fill the void, all of the television sports channels almost immediately flipped the switch to playing classic games, focusing on features and finding anyone and anything to talk about on their programming and panel shows.

However, within a month, many were getting tired of re-runs of Scotties and Brier curling games, historically significant CFL match-ups and an endless loop of Blue Jays games that ran the gamut from great to boring.

Admittedly though, getting to see some of the greatest moments in Montreal Expos history has been wonderful to see again.

Yet, it isn’t just fans, players and coaches that are missing out, but it’s also the officials that have been sitting on the sidelines.

These individuals — most notably the ones that cover amateur sports — do it for the love of that particular sport and to continue participating with many doing so to give back. Normally, these people use this activity as their time to exercise, to get away from the usual stresses while also getting the chance to visit with people they have known for years.

A lot of them also officiate different sports throughout the various seasons, so when there is a shutdown like has happened this year, it can really inhibit many aspects of life.

On the other side of this, this pandemic has demonstrated to many just what they have been missing when it comes to their family.

Whether one has been forced to remain isolated at home due to working from home, layoffs, other restrictions, reduced hours or changes because your job is listed as essential, there is no doubt people have been witness to things they wouldn’t see if this was a normal time.

That includes seeing what their children can create or do with an imagination, learning more about their personalities, their likes and dislikes as well as talking to them about how they feel about various things.

One can also find out quite quickly what subjects and things their kids are good at in school. Additionally, a parent can learn just as quick how long ago it was you were learning in Grade 10 what your child in Grade 7 is doing now.

However, one of the biggest lessons learned has been getting to know the children better as one is no longer spending extraordinary hours at work, followed by rushing to eat and get back out the door that night for other activities.

Turns out many people have been missing a whole lot more than they thought.

But that is…just an observation.

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