Memoir of afterlife packs punch for readers

Nobody packs a suitcase like you do. A weekend away? No problem.

Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander, M.D. c.2012, Simon & Schuster

$23.99 / $27.99 Canada 208 pages

Nobody packs a suitcase like you do.

A weekend away? No problem. Cram everything you need in a tote and go.

A two-week cruise? Again, no problem. You can roll, fold, and stuff half-a-closet in a carryon and still have room for a book.

It’s a gift. You’re like a squirrel when it comes to packing but there’s one trip you’ll have to make someday, and you won’t have to pack a thing.

Yes, you’re going to die. But what happens and what awaits us on our final journey? In Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander, M.D., you’ll read about one man’s weeklong experience, and the inspiring souvenirs he brought back.

It all started with a backache in the middle of the night.

Neurosurgeon Eben Alexander awoke from the pain and headed for a warm bath, thinking it might help. It didn’t, and neither did a backrub from his wife, Holley. The pain, in fact, intensified.

By mid-morning, Alexander was nearly unconscious.

Rushed to the hospital, he landed in the ICU, surrounded by baffled doctors who believed that he’d somehow acquired spontaneous E. coli meningitis. His spinal fluid and the outer portion of his brain were filled with pus. There was no brain activity and no precedent: the affliction was a one in 10 million rarity.

But something amazing was happening to Eban Alexander.

Alexander says his first notion was that he was surrounded by primordial jelly, aware but not aware, and he could hear sounds. Working his way upwards and toward “dazzling darkness,” he was greeted by a beautiful woman who took him on a breathtaking journey on a butterfly wing. She told him three things: he was loved, he was valued, and there was nothing he could do wrong.

One week after Alexander’s coma began, doctors informed Holley that he had virtually no chance of recovery yet, literally, as they were walking to his room to stop treatment, he opened his eyes. Within months, fully recuperated, he started to cautiously talk about his journey because what he saw, he says, opened his mind and his heart.

No doubt, Proof of Heaven is a thinking person’s book.

Filled with serious science, medical information, and awe-inspiring theology, author Eban Alexander, M.D. gives his readers a lot to chew on. But this memoir isn’t just that: Alexander also gives us an abundance of absorbing back story, so we know why his spiritual journey was mind-bogglingly significant and why he believes that it unfolded as it did. What’s interesting is that Alexander was a skeptic once, and now he struggles to convince the skeptics.

The only bumps in the road here are that he wrestles with descriptions of his experience. He admits mere words don’t do his visions justice, but he tries anyhow — which is magnificent at first, then just repetitious.

Even so, most of this book will stick with you for a long time after you close its back cover, making you seriously contemplate what you’ve read. Whether you’re a believer or an undecided scoffer, in fact, I think Proof of Heaven will pack a wallop.

Just Posted

A Ponoka student’s artwork is in the runnings for an Orange shirt logo competition

Voting is open for St. Augustine’s Emma Wittal’s work. Her art is in the top five out of 665 pieces

Ponoka council approves sale of Kinsmen Community Centre for $480,000

Council accepts offer to purchase of $480,000 with sale taking effect Jan. 1, 2019

Ponoka union staff approve strike

“Vast majority” of staff voted in favour of a strike against the town, 72-hours notice required

Ponoka mayor responds to strike vote and contingency plans

Ponoka union strike vote triggers 120 day strike action

Canada won’t ‘play politics’ on U.S. migrant children policy

The U.S. government is under fire over its ”zero tolerance” policy

Late goal gives England 2-1 win over Tunisia

At the last World Cup in 2014, England couldn’t even win a game

Canadian military police officer pleads not guilty to sex assault

Sgt. Kevin MacIntyre, 48, entered his plea today at a court martial proceeding in Halifax

Three junior hockey players injured starting campfire

Ryan Vandervlis, a 20-year old centre with Lethbridge Hurricanes has been placed in a medically induced coma

Cheers erupt as Federal Court judge approves historic gay purge settlement

Gay military veterans said they were interrogated, harassed and spied on because of their sexuality

Major tire theft at Wetaskiwin auto dealership

Wetaskiwin RCMP estimated $70,000 worth of tires and rims stolen

Capitals coach resigns after Stanley Cup win

Barry Trotz announced his resignation on Monday

Leduc RCMP investigate small plane crash

No injuries after plane crashes in lake

Sweden beats South Korea 1-0

Sweden gets benefit of video review in World Cup

Most Read