The Race to Mars

About two-thirds of the attempted missions to Mars have failed, and the Curse of Mars also applies to Asian countries.

About two-thirds of the attempted missions to Mars have failed, and the Curse of Mars also applies to Asian countries. China’s first try failed when the Russian rocket carrying its Mars orbiter into space fell back to Earth in 2011. Undaunted, India seized the opportunity to be the first Asian country to go to Mars.

Fifteen months after Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced the decision, India’s half-tonne Mangalyaan vehicle is ready to be sent off to the red planet. Unless the Mars Curse gets it, by the time you read this it will be in orbit, boosted there by an Indian rocket, and within two weeks it will set course for Mars.

There is something faintly ridiculous about India and China “racing” to be the first Asian country to reach Mars, but it’s no more ridiculous than the Russian-American space race of the 1960s. Nationalism is part of the motivation behind every country’s space programme, and while it has its comical side it does at least persuade the political authorities to provide the large sums that are needed.

Like the old Russo-American space race, the Chinese-Indian one will accelerate the development of new technologies and techniques. It will fill some of the gap left by the loss of momentum in the older space powers, and some useful science will get done. But the biggest reason for welcoming the entry of major new players in space exploration is the one that everybody is too embarrassed to mention: the future of the human race.

Well, almost everybody. Elon Musk, the founder and CEO of SpaceX, the private company that aims to dominate the delivery-to-orbit service once provided by NASA, actually wants to create a human colony on Mars in his own lifetime – and he’s 41 now.

He is a serious player, whose large fortune (derived from his creation and subsequent sale of PayPal) is now devoted to manufacturing electric cars and building space transportation systems. Both projects are prospering, and he sees them as providing the financial and technological basis for pursuing his real goal: spreading human beings beyond this single planetary habitat while the launch window for that is still open.

Musk was quite frank about that in an interview with Rory Carroll in The Guardian newspaper last July. ”The lessons of history suggest that civilisations move in cycles,” he said. “You can track that back quite far – the Babylonians, the Sumerians. We’re in a very upward cycle right now, and hopefully that remains the case. But it might not.

“There could be some series of events that cause that technology level to decline. Given that this is the first time in 4.5 billion years where it’s been possible for humanity to extend life beyond Earth, it seems like we’d be wise to act while the window was open and not count on the fact that it will be open a long time.”

I’ll let you in on a little secret. That is a big part of the motivation (though a rarely admitted part) for half the people who work in any of the national space programmes, including India’s. They value the science, and they may even revel in the glory from time to time, but that’s what it’s really about.

Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

 

Just Posted

Lots planned for Ponoka’s family day

There’s a whole list of fun family events set in Ponoka

Reward offered to find man charged in 2006 murder

RCMP are offering up to $5000 for information leading to the arrest of Kevin Brown

Background checks required for retail cannabis locations

Strict rules and regulations for retail locations was announced at a press conference this morning

Adults and youths charged in multiple armed robberies

Maskwacis and Wetaskiwin RCMP solved multiple armed robberies investigations

WATCH: Red Deer celebrates one year out from 2019 Canada Games

Community gathers at Great Chief Park to commemorate Games milestone

WATCH: Red Deer celebrates one year out from 2019 Canada Games

Community gathers at Great Chief Park to commemorate Games milestone

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Trudeau family arrives in India for state visit

Seven-day visit includes meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi

Military seeks DNA experts to help ID missing war dead

Federal program recovers, identifies and arranges burials for Canada’s nearly 28,000 missing war dead

PHOTOS: CP Rail train derailment near Ellerslie Road

A train derailed on the south end of Edmonton closes streets

Most Canadians believe journalism plays critical role in democracy: poll

Survey suggests 94 per cent of Canadians feel journalism plays ‘important’ part

13 Russians charged in Mueller investigation

Special counsel alleges illegal meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election

Trump considers global steel tariffs, potentially hitting Canada

Canada is the United States’ biggest supplier of both steel and aluminum

Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux announce separation

Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux announced Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, that they have separated

Most Read