Are you heading for the Hockey Hall of Fame or Hall of Pain?

Canadians from coast to coast have a love for hockey that often takes them off the couch and onto the rink. But, according to a recent Leger Marketing survey, one in five Canadians experience aches and pains as result of winter sports like hockey.

  • Nov. 12, 2008 10:00 a.m.

(NC)—Canadians from coast to coast have a love for hockey that often takes them off the couch and onto the rink. But, according to a recent Leger Marketing survey, one in five Canadians experience aches and pains as result of winter sports like hockey.

If that weekly game of shinny is leaving you sore, here are some things you might want to remember to reduce your chance of pain and increase your chance of scoring that game winning goal.

Training drills – Most hockey injuries happen as a skater stops. It puts stress on the ankles and throws off the centre of balance. Exercises that strengthen your core will help improve your balance and your range of motion in all directions.

Injured list – Whether you play full contact hockey, or just a friendly backyard game, odds are at some point you’ll be on the “injured list.” When you’ve been benched because of aches and pains, try taking an over-the-counter pain reliever like Tylenol or Motrin. It’ll help reduce your pain and get you back on the ice faster.

Final buzzer – The third period can feel a long way away if you don’t have the energy to play a full game. Make sure you keep your energy level up by eating a healthy meal with carbs and plenty of vegetables four to six hours before your game. Make sure you’re well hydrated too. Drink plenty of water before and during the game.

Post-game analysis – After a good game, your first instinct may be to get out of your hockey gear and head to the bar with the team. But, first, be sure to stretch out all your muscles thoroughly. Stretching will help your muscles recover faster – just in time for the next game!