Give the gift of Canadian legacy

Canadian athletes work incredibly hard to achieve their goals on the field or rink, but sometimes the biggest challenges happen after training is over for the day. Securing funding for equipment, competitions or training space can be huge obstacles for athletes who are just starting out.

  • Nov. 19, 2008 12:00 p.m.

(NC)—Canadian athletes work incredibly hard to achieve their goals on the field or rink, but sometimes the biggest challenges happen after training is over for the day. Securing funding for equipment, competitions or training space can be huge obstacles for athletes who are just starting out.

“As a developing athlete, it can be hard to get recognition and funding,” says Courtney Condie, a Taekwondo athlete from Ontario. “I have pre-carded status, so companies are less likely to invest in me – even though I need the money to enter international competitions to become carded and compete in the Olympic Games. It’s kind of a catch-22.”

That’s where long time Olympic sponsor Petro-Canada comes in. They have a 20 year legacy of supporting developing athletes and their coaches, dating back to their support of the Calgary Olympic Winter Games in 1988. To celebrate the Olympic Games, Petro-Canada created commemorative glasses which were sold at their retail service stations. These glasses became wildly popular, ultimately resulting in over 50 million glasses sold.

The money from the glassware sales was used to create the Petro-Canada Olympic Torch Scholarship Fund (OTSF), and was earmarked for developing, pre-carded athletes. Since 1988, over $6 million in scholarships has been given to over 2,000 athletes and coaches. The OTSF, now renamed the Fueling Athlete and Coaching Excellence (FACE) program, is one of the largest sources of private sport-related funding in Canada.

“For 20 years, we’ve been helping developing Canadian athletes achieve their Olympic dreams,” says Steven Keith, director of Olympic and Community Partnerships at Petro-Canada. “We’re incredibly proud of our legacy of helping young Canadians.”

With the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Canada’s own backyard, Petro-Canada is marking the occasion with a new set of commemorative glassware. The set includes the 16 oz. general purpose glass, a 14 oz. tumbler, a 13 oz. mug and a 20 oz. pilsner style glass. Reminiscent of an ice carving, each glass is clear with the Olympic Games logo embossed on one side, and an etching of an individual and a tree on the other. With a portion of the proceeds going towards supporting the Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, this is one holiday gift that truly gives back.

Just Posted

Ponoka Agricultural Society Bench Show winners, photos

The Ponoka Agricultural Society’s annual Bench Show was held at the Ponoka… Continue reading

The Ponoka Little League girls softball team win bronze

Ponoka defeated Calgary 17-2 in Canadian Little League playoffs

Ponoka Aquaplex will be closed from Aug. 25 to Sept. 30.

Many improvements planned for Ponoka pool

Ponoka County agrees to next step for Rimbey Agrim

Full time manager will help Rimbey Agrim Centre’s financial stability

Disney Plus to launch in Canada in November

Analysts say latest streaming service may escalate cord cutting

Panel to review impacts of safe injection sites in Alberta

It will look at crime rates, social order and property values, and not harm reduction or housing

Five suspects arrested by Leduc RCMP with help of Wetaskiwin and Maskwacis

Leduc RCMP work with Maskwacis and Wetaskiwin RCMP to make arrests

Elections Canada to assess ‘partisan’ climate change rhetoric case by case

People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier has said climate change is not an emergency nor caused by human

PHOTOS: 5th Annual Alix rodeo bucks the competition

Cowboys and cowgirls risked it all at the Alix Rodeo

Wetaskiwin RCMP arrest two in Camrose after report of suspicious persons

Fugitives try to flee on ATVS, one allegedly steals police car

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Most Read